Author Feature: King Bell

by | May 20, 2022 | Author, Author Feature | 0 comments

King Bell is the author of the incendiary political book: American’t The Corporate Plantation, a timely fictional book about deeply rooted prejudices against Black America in the eyes of Black America. It is a tale of joy and sorrow. It is an angry narrative that encourages people to think. It may be a fictional account, but the issues and experiences tackled in its pages are very real.

King Bell was born Jerome Nyjuan Bell. His love for literature, especially Black literature, while at a very young age can be seen in how much he spends one day reading one book. He devoured the works of other famous African American authors who wrote about Black History. His great interest in the subject allowed him to meet most people who would later become his influences. This includes James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and many other Black American greats. Bell has stated his frustration on how these people, despite their extraordinary contributions to the Whole of America, did not become household names. Bell was especially frustrated with how America makes it difficult for students to study them without racking more debt. Bell is also frustrated with how little has changed about the horrible treatment Black America gets from White America. Bell’s passion and curiosity for his people’s history inside the story of America’s identity became the impetus for starting to work on his book, American’t: The Corporate Plantation. When not writing books, King Bell works as a businessman and real estate agent in Fayetteville, North Carolina. He possesses a degree in Business Administration which he got from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in Tallahassee, Florida. He then proceeded to get his Master’s Degree for Business Administration from Averett University in Danville, Virginia. 

King Bell is also a United States Marine Corps Veteran, where he would exit after serving ten years.

American’t : The Corporate Plantation.

How would you feel if you were born in a country that doesn’t even want you? Such is the question that haunts African Americans every day of their life. This is also the question with which King Bell builds the foundation of his book, American’t: The Corporate Plantation.

Written from the perspective of six Black men, it details how they live their lives in a home that can’t seem to love them, America. It observes these young men, as they maneuver the corporate world of their country just so they could live another day. Life is hard for these people as they face inequalities, adversity, and hostility from their very own fellow citizens. Their lives are very different. Their lives are very nuanced. Each character has their own life, and each of them tackle their everyday existence in their own way. Never knowing when it all ends.

Slavery was supposed to have ended a hundred years ago. Racial segregation, discrimination, and disenfranchisement should have ended with the Civil Rights Movement during the 1950s and the 1960s. But for Black Americans, how much really has changed? Why does America still treat its black brothers and sisters with such disdain? Why does America find it so hard to afford its black sons and daughters the same opportunities enjoyed by their fairer-skinned counterparts? American’t may not have the answer to these questions, but author King Bell does lay these issues bare for all to see.

American’t maybe a fictional story, but the ideas and emotions it represents are very real. American’t may be about the Black people, but it is not exclusively for them. It is for every non-white American citizen who thinks their country does not want them. Above all, it is for the very same white people who don’t know what it feels like to be black in America.

You can find out more about King Bell’s American’t the Corporate Plantation, and buy it through his website.

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